What’s your SOP for biomass purchasing

I understand that there are an enormous amount of liars and scammers in the industry, and things need to be safe guarded, so I am wondering what your standard SOP looks like. Specifically, when do you show/or expect to be shown a COA.

I have some people requesting to talk to a lawyer or get a bank statement before they will show a COA. Just want to hear other’s thoughts on this

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I won’t do business with anyone that doesn’t provide COA’s at the start of a transaction. There’s no proprietary information contained in a COA, unless of course the company is claiming a proprietary cannabinoid blend, so there’s no reason to withhold it.

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First thing. If you can’t show me what you are trying to sell me i’ll find someone else. Creating barriers for sales = lost sales

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Ok THANK YOU. In this past week I have had these huge bio buyers… i’ve been feeling like I have to give away my first born child to get a gander at the full panel COA

May have just lost a huge sale because of it… sad

Not only should biomass sellers be providing you the COA without hassle but they should also offer to allow independent testing by having you come to visit them and take random samples for testing. It’s a buyers market and they should be doing everything possible to make the buyer comfortable with the transaction. Would a car dealer expect you to buy a six figure high performance luxury car without a test drive? Spending that same amount of money on biomass shouldn’t be thought of any differently.

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If you’re buying biomass add something along these lines to your purchase agreement: Biomass must have a COA for potency, heavy metals, microbial, and pesticide testing. A second randomized sample will be performed by the buyer, and at the buyers expense. Should the results not pass testing and conflict with the initial COA, the purchase is void and the seller incurs the cost of testing. The seller is then offered the opportunity to resubmit randomized samples at their own cost if they believe there was an error. If the results are satisfactory, the buyer incurs the testing fee’s as a quality control cost.

Edit: If the purchase can be done through Escrow, even better.

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While we can read between the lines, and figure out what you’re actually asking, it’s not clear you understand the meaning of SOP.

As in “What is your standard Standard Operating Procedure?” is not in fact a answerable question until you define the object of the game.

You mention wanting to see their COA,

Yet there is the implication that you are selling, in which case it is YOU who should supply the COA.

Can you clarify why you would need someone else’s COA before you can sell?!?

Edit: updated thread title to clarify (hopefully).

cyclo i think you’re misreading his posts heh

Which is easy to do given

“What’s your SOP” :wink:

Edit: sorry “Whats your SOP?” :upside_down_face:

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In theory, you could have an actual SOP for purchasing and sales that your purchasing department uses. Although we tend to think of SOPs in terms of manufacturing.

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Sure, and without stating the goal of said procedure the question is essentially meaningless.

Certainly not useful for anyone else trying to find answers to the same question.

Which is the whole point of this place…

Edit: so here’s another thread… Low yielding biomass, SOP for Biomass potency testing, and thoughts (which states the goal of the procedure being standardized…)

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heh, oh well. I understood what he was asking even if the wording was a little jank.

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COA is on website products these days. You expect it on initial pitch.

“COA available upon request” = We need to try to bullshit you on why this COA is actually ok.

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Agreed…

Subject line changed to try and make the answer more generally available…

Imo acquisition should also be accompanied by a test extraction that is sent out for pesticide testing, unless you’ve got a working relationship with a lab who will look harder on biomass destined for extraction.

Excellent point, can you estimate a LOQ for flower that would ensure safe extract?

I suspect that varies by pesticide.

Fortunately I’ve not had to worry about this as most of the biomass I’ve run was grown in-house.

Unfortunately, I no longer have access to the lab that used to do that for me.

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We use the farmer’s COA as a reference but we ALWAYS collect our own samples and then use a 3rd party lab to have testing done before buying any biomass.

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How are you sampling?

Tips or tools for getting representative samples?

Edit: thc intake thread: What are your bag and tag procedures

HAHAHA!!!

Dead on – and perfect write-up on transaction handling.

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