Recommendations for first time fungi growers

I’ll check it out, thanks!

There’s more than one way to skin a cat…I will disagree with @very.good.cannabis on the isolating from petri dishes…its a major pain in the ass. You end up having to keep up with a bunch of dishes in the end, untill you find the one you want to keep. It’s much easier to take tissue samples from shrooms that you know are good. Its basically the same concept as seed breeding vs cloning. The biggest gamechanger for me was the petri dishe coupled with a flow hood. Went from 50% contamination to ZERO.
And I agree with @very.good.cannabis liquid culture is a gamechanger , it can turn a home grow into a very large commercial grow, very quickly. Use the shroomery website…search slurry tech… Get away from the PF jars as soon as you can…Into quart jars…Then move into the myco bags. The slurry tech and bags put together will save hours of work in front of the flow hood.


Home made for $150 to $200

Slurry jars

AUGER dishes

This dish has been put up for 4 years now, still clean and ready to use.

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What’s going on in the flow hood? fruiting?? I assume that’s where it goes after innoculation, right?

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the simplest is sometimes the best.

Glovebox
Spores from TheHawkEye
Grain from Shroom Supply
Compost from High Mountain Compost

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All of the technical work is done in front of a flow hood. Sterile air flows over your goodies.

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Corn spawn?
I thought that was just me🤔

My excuse was that I was required to pull all the open pollenated ears from our research plots so volunteers didn’t wreck the research.

What’s yours?

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You cant work with dishes in a glovebox. If you start out with the PF jars the glovebox is fine. But when your ready to stop wasting time with contamination …you will want to get a flow hood

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Is it literally just a box to work in with an air filter mounted on it?

Literally…you got it

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I would definitely agree with using a tissue sample to create liquid culture way easier. I was thinking about how I would get started with some basic supplies and a syringe of spores. Tissue sampling is super easy. I’ve had my best luck just using a syringe.

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I once had the homeboy shopping network (guy pushing a shopping cart in West Oakland CA) ring my doorbell with a couple of large hepa filters. Paid him $10 for the pair. Gave them to a buddy to build a hood with when I left dogtown for the emerald city about a year later. The shit this guy bought by was just mind boggling sometimes…

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Do you think my plywood flow hood will pass the GMP?
:cowboy_hat_face:

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KISS … Learned this acronym when i was training to become a pilot… very helpful!!.. yes after you fruit and get some experience you will want to clone the nicest fruits in your tubs. Do the easy stuff first… there will be no need for laminar flow hood if you use the technique i described earlier to get your very high probability successful first time flushes…

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https://www.azurestandard.com/shop/search/rye%20grain

This s where to get your Rye grains. I would buy hundreds of pounds at a time. So yea a flow hood(edit: was) is a must have item for me.

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Those shrooms do actually grow outside, which is far from sterile. Right after psilocybe fanatacus, the next mushroom internet hero of the 90s was a guy in Arizona who went by the name of ryche hawk, I believe. He pioneered taking those colonized pf cakes and applying a casing over them, which was I think peat, vermiculite, and he liked oyster shells in it as well. There is no sterile tek to it after the cakes come out of the jar. The casing is an oxygen rich environment that discourages anaerobic growth, which include the molds that ruin the fun guys. If you live in florida, you can just set that outside and it grows fine…or so I have heard :slight_smile:

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That’s a pretty good excuse to use corn and a good usage, @cyclopath. As good as any really.

I’ve never been asked why. I guess I use corn because I find it’s cheap and readily available. I now have a familiarity with it. Nothing more than that really. I guess I find it’s also multipurpose. I love pop corn, tortillas,corn whiskey and corn grown fungus.

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Are you suggesting that spores with quart jars can’t be done effectively in a still air box that cost 5$ at Walmart

No…I’m suggesting you cant work with petri dishes in a glovebox…if you are working with spores and if that’s all your working with. The glovebox will do. Why would you use a flow hood if your using dirty prints on a daily basis. I like my monotubs to flush for months on end.

Edit: just for clarity…for new myco peeps…glovebox and still air box…is the same thing

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#1 petri dishes (stops wasted time in contamination)
#2 flow hood (stop wasted time in contamination and saves 80% of your time during inoculations)
#3 slurry tech coupled with myco bags (this is where you save the 80% time to inoculate) plus a bonus of being 2x to 4x as fast to colonize.

Edit: I just droped the microphone with my hands up. :cowboy_hat_face:

Edit 2: at that time in my life, I had 20 years experience doing sterile techniques…I freaking pulled my hair out trying to figure out why I could not get better than 50% to 2ed flush (with PF cakes). It’s so obvious now. But I tried every way to get CLEAN spores. And I’m not referring to prints.
#1 dishes with a flow hood

3rd edit: it all boils down to what you intend or expect to accomplish with your given effort. $200 DIY flow hood = 100% flushes for 4 or 5 times …way beyond their value or expected life span :wink:

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I knew the guy who did the inner reservoir technique from psilocybin fanaticus, that was an awesome website back in the day. Migjt have to get back to it