Ideas for used Bio-Mass

#1

Anyone have ideas for spent hemp (extracted) biomass at the rate of 3000-4000lbs a day?

We are looking at pelletizing with binders and a secondary market.

I am open to all ideas crazy and practical.

Thank you in advance.

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Extracted Biomass Uses
#2

feed it to hogs,cattle, or goats.


got any other permaculture ideas @future?

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#3

pelletizing and burning might be an option. it won’t work in an All Power Labs gasifier, but I believe they’re working on a steam generator now that would work with this feed stock.

I’m aiming at cellulosic ethanol. Rainier Distillers claimed they have that solved when I last talked to them, but I haven’t gotten my fungal savant in touch with them, and am currently not convinced.

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Ethanol's expensive. Make your own from your waste biomass?
#4

I still really like the idea of BioPulping

Fungi consumes the lignin, leaving behind a clean cellulose, and converts that lignin into chitin

Two valuable products with minimal overhead and startup costs

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#5

so just make yourself a lagoon, pig farmer style, and rot that stuff in a puddle?

setting it on fire seems like so much more fun.

turning it into actual accelerant (cellulosic ethanol) would bring me joy :slight_smile:

:fire: :fire: :fire:

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#6

Do you know what fungus is used for that?

I was just going over the hydroxide/sulphuric method and not really being excited about it.

#7

my fun guy probably has much of that literature in his head. Pretty sure he picked through the biopulping strain lists to get the candidates he’s playing with.

Probably time I tried catching up with him on the subject…(as if)

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#8

Here’s an interesting study using Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 to delignify hemp.

Data Dump BioPulp Link

Specifically they are investigating the use of a protease to lower the Nitrogen before introducing the fungi.

But overall the article is packed full of interesting info. Like, for instance…

"White-rot fungi are the most important organisms
responsible for the degradation of complex aromatic lignin macromolecules in nature. Their outstanding lignin-degrading potential is attributed to the unique ability of white-rot fungi to produce potent extracellular oxidative enzymes. The best-characterized enzymes implicated in lignin oxidation are lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase (Kirk and Farrell 1987; Reid 1995). Due to their ability to degrade lignin, combined with their capacity to produce polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes, white-rot fungi have the potential to completely degrade all the major components of lignocellulose. However, several white-rot strains are capable of the selective degradation of lignin.

Selective lignin degradation has been extensively
described in Chilean hardwoods degraded by Ganoderma australe, which is a naturally occurring white-rotted wood (so called “palo podrido”) used as cattle feed in Chile (Dill and Kraepelin 1986; Ríos and Eyzaguirre 1992). Following this example from nature, a number of studies have demonstrated that several white-rot fungal strains from the genera Ceriporiopsis, Ganoderma, Pleurotus and Stropharia cause selective lignin degradation of straw and bagasse, improving their digestibility for ruminants (Akin et al. 1993; Kamra et al. 1993; Zadrazil et al. 1996).

Selective white-rot fungi have also been considered for biopulping. Biopulping entails the fungal pretreatment of wood chips prior to pulping as a means to save energy, enhance pulp quality and reduce environmental impact (Akhtar et al. 1997; Messner 1998). Ceriporiopsis subvermispora is the most important biopulping strain for both hardwoods and softwoods (Akhtar et al. 1997)."

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#9

White rot fungi are why we are gonna run out of oil in just a bit.

Little buggers went and ate all the dead trees…

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#10

You can send your leftover biomass to me! I will feed it to my goats, horses and cattle!!!