Specially coated tubes allow viscous fluids to flow faster than water - cart fillers dream

Im sure this is gonna lead to some cool things in this industry.

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neat!

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Maybe this is what @BeakerandWrench was suggesting with his heat blanket. Maybe he has the “special” tubes too

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So it the viscous fluid essentially ‘falling’ down the tubes compared to the watery fluid?

That’s super neat btw.

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the thicker viscosity fluids are traveling faster in a hydrophobic tube than the thinner fluids. The inverse happens when the fluids are traveling over a hydrophobic surface.

@ScoobyDoobie , not sure how this effects stationary fluids or slow moving fluids? Does the air boundary remain?

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Not sure, im still trying to find more to read about on it

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Yep, I get that, just trying to follow along with concepts I can understand. Y’all talk above my head quite a bit.

I was referring to the air layer differences between the two fluids, the viscous fluid has a “thicker” layer of air separating it and the nano tubes.

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Combine this w the ‘fluxing magnetic rosin pusher’ cart, we’ll be putting all kinds of consumables in there.

I mean, I prefer dabs, but the future is looking super future-y

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Maybe now I can answer d8 labs calls without a sense of dread

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I don’t see anything that says this would work for oils. They used glycerol as an example which is water soluble.

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Bingo, this might be like the ceramic coating that they put on the front of the space ship and now cars/planes/boats.

I know because I have my vehicles ceramic coated and I can set fire to the hood and nothing happens to the paint.

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I haven’t read it at all yet but if stoopkid had a proper look then it’s probably inconsequential to distillate. sounds like just a capillary tube with hydrophobic coating plus substances that can hydrogen bond

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I’m looking to see if the phenomenon only occurs with polar substances like honey on hydrophobic surfaces.

I’m sure that the hydrophobic coating isn’t compatible with terpenes, but what I want to know is if this phenomenon can be duplicated with a different coating and a different substance (crude).

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It only mentions being hydrophobic. If you look up “oleophobic coating,” the technology is already widely available for tons of applications. You can even buy a spray and put it on your phone/boots etc so they just never get dirty. There’s some pretty amusing videos of people squirting mustard and things all over stuff coated in it and it just runs right off without leaving a stain.

As for it being compatible with things like terpenes or solvents… that I would be doubtful of. Terpenes are a nightmare for plastics that are otherwise resistant to solvents. That would be a question for the manufacturer. I’m certain it’s possible I just don’t think anyone has explored it for this application yet.

Perhaps on surfaces that don’t come in direct contact with consumable product it could be useful to keep the lab tidy, at the very least. If someone can confirm it would be compatible with oil/terpenes then I know of one very very useful application that has not been mentioned yet.

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I didn’t say that it would be, thats why I’m looking to find out the reason why the air gap exists at all. I’m not looking to use the same coating they used for honey.

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That was my initial curiosity, exactly how are they creating the hydrophobic surface. The most common method is to coat the surface with the opposite polarity as the fluid transferred. In this case it seems they are creating physical surface interactions, ie micro ridges that traps air pockets and reduces the contact area between the surface and fluid.
I think the key take away here is that when that coating is applied inside a pipe the more viscous fluids travel faster which is not the case with other “flat” surfaces.

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Could’t cart makers avoid all of that with pre-heated glass? Sort of like demister tech for rear windscreens, can pipe low heat to any concentrate causing it to loosen and populate the element. It would get you to the next hit faster and ensure proper population but leakage would be my concern.

The point is that viscous liquids will be able to flow faster through a coated tube than a regular glass tube because the glass tube doesn’t allow for a tiny gap of air around the substance. I think you missed the point of the whole thing, obviously cart makers can make it flow with heat the point is this can make it flow faster.

You would still have to heat your crude to make it flow anyhow. But just applying a coating to the tube won’t cut it because like @Soxhlet pointed out, that air gap probably won’t remain if there’s a stationary reservoir of liquid at the top of the tube.

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No I got the point but was wondering why lengths were made for something that imo would just require a touch of warmth. I am just an observer and a consumer so my opinions on the matter shouldn’t be taken with weight honestly.

I just felt heat alone would fix the issue rather than going for different coatings or elaborate designs. But again, uneducated opinion from a consumer.