Hot vapors through CRC jacket?

I’m thinking every system should have hot vapors go through a jacket on CRC/filter stack. The issue with this being changing your media. With something like the stinger from Bhogart this would be no issue you could have significantly less clogs and faster recovery. I ordered pieces to test but honestly I feel kinda dumb for taking this long to realize the energy I was wasting.

Anyone doing this?

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Why would you want to heat your media?

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It’s the new tek bruh…
Haven’t you caught on it yet?

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Been using our solvent vapor for years. Never used nitrogen in my life with our systems in fact.

This pretty much falls under our patent pending refrigeration tech that is currently in review. We covered both heating and cooling properties (on an entire new level) with some very simple tech additions.

Gotta make sure everything is rated for the pressure of course. I have literally flattened a couple columns during the initial prototype testing phase.

CRC temp is important… Have found some interesting aspects. Ever try reusing media? How many times? Have pushed that window pretty far.

Both hot and cold CRC have a purpose… Think of it more as chromatography than filtration. Heat can effect the transfer rate of what is being adsorbed by the media. But also cold can cause molecules to crash out and clog the column. It’s just a matter of knowing when you want it hot or cold and by how much to best bring about the desired result.

If you want more information please send an email to sales@illuminatedextractors.com as we currently have no other authorized dealers for this technology.

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Amp equipment/ heady dabber makes a nice dual column jacketed CRC. You could drop a disc on the lid and force it through the disc into the seconds CRC and probably achieve vapor. You really don’t want to phase shift going through “chroma”/CRC. Multiple columns can achieve great fractions too.

I misunderstood I think. You want to heat your CRC with vapor?

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Certain medias I’ve tested either adsorb different things warm or more things warm, either way the ones I use work better “warm” compared to -80 c fresh out of my columns. Furthermore stalling out my CRC with certain medias I would prefer to not bake (because it functions better unbaked and it’s a pain in the ass) causes flow to be very slow upon pushing again. I’ve found heating it a little I can push more material through my media of choice faster and get the same result.

There is no chance of phase change considering your pushing through CRC at decent pressure and when your tane + cannabinoids hits collection pot it is closer to it’s phase change temperature due to the hot vapors and when the hot vapors hit the CRC they cool down and phase change back to a liquid faster upon entering the recovery coil.

Only downside I could see is if your preferred media doesn’t work as well a bit warmer.

It should speed up both phase changes as well as speed up flow rate through the system if done correctly.

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I’ve been wanting to try it, personally. Just to fuck around.

Every paper I’ve read about using clays for edible oil processing involves a lot more heat and much longer contact time with the media (agitated typically)

Well over 200°. I doubt we’re capable of heating up our butane that much

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Ive been down this road, unless your going to get a dedicated thermal system for just your crc or get a fancy zone heater circulation system I dont think its worth it. We had a jacketed crc plumbed into our AES heater circulator same time and temp as our collection @ 28c and it caused issues with channeling anytime the flow was cut, we were flushing our crc with clean tane to prevent clogs between shots.

FWIW, Im sure there is a sweet spot for the temp but it sure didnt increase the amount of bio we could put thru the media and it didnt improve color ime

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Happy to share my system design with anyone that books me for a phone consult

your heat availability will change over your run as your vapor availability changes.
it’s better to have a closed loop for temperature control.

if you really want to save this heat of compression exchange it into your solution before your evaporator.

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You probably want to describe what people are paying for, if you want responses beyond this snarky one here.

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This should be a hint to the peeps wondering about running crc cold. Tempature effects solubility I’m all directions

See thread title and original post Hot vapors through CRC jacket?

If you’re not interested, no worries. I really gotta get paid to even discuss further. Hope you understand and are having a nice memorial weekend !

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People are assholes when they can’t afford to pay to gain knowledge :joy::popcorn:

You seem like you’re on a real bitter streak lately. I should know, but you’re kinda eliminating any goodwill you had after that thread where you were too whiney to walk a booth down and rip out a power cord.

Rip out a power cord?
There’s rules and regulations to exhibiting on city property, you can’t go tamper with others property.

Go get some professional help.

I do something of this sorts. If you run you recovery line threw your crc jacket it should act as a per condenser befor your coil. I ran a coil between my material columns and crc. I used a 6" triclamp solvent tank coil inside a 6x48 spool. I cut the dip tube off. I ran my recovery vapors threw this spool containing the cold coil between my material and crc columns. The recover vapors warm the solute in the coil before it enters the crc. Stealing cold from another part of the process actually provide a tad bit of pre condinsation before your main condenser. I’ve noticed a 25% decrease in dry ice usage also. As long as you can inject slowly your recovery will keep up. As soon as I see the crc drain and the coil runs out of cold solute my coil pot starts rumbling up like normal. 2 birds with one stone. Warmer solute and precondensing benifits.

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