Carbonation of Resin Prior to Extraction (Extractioneering)

I have know about the company Extractioneering for a while and followed their invention/popularity of HTFSE and HCFSE but didnt realize that their extracts are carbonated. I did some research on their page and they claim that they use dry ice to add Co2 to the plant prior to extraction. They do this to protect the resin molecules and make the smell and taste profile in tact. I would imagine it would also effect crystallization of THCA/CBD with the agitation post extraction.

Quotes from their website: https://www.extractioneering.com/post/q-a-with-dr-daniel-hayden
“This carbonates The trichomes and co2 is then Bound to all resin molecules protecting them through extract maturity. After the extracted resin is ‘cured’ it continues to release co2 from these molecules and when agitated, it increases this release.”

“It’s important to note the carbonation is achieved prior to extraction. We know many groups trying to carbonate resin during and after extraction. Dynamics of plant biochemistry tell us why they cannot do that. Co2 extractors still may have some achievements not revealed to us.”

I imagine one would use dry ice to chill down your material overnight with the right amount so it absorbs Co2. I remember when I used dry ice to winterize and left my ethanol container open and the ethanol was carbonated when I tried to filter it.

Does anyone know about this extraction process?

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I just did a quick look on their site and it appears they’re using cured flower and a blend of solvents? I’m very new to this so I’m not much help, sorry!

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They are using co2 extraction machines and just performing terp extractions followed by thca extraction then they reintroduce each other. They are leaving the residual co2 in there products to keep it carbonated. I believe co2 extractions don’t have to be below a certain ppm

Nvm I am wrong I thought they did not use hydrocarbons from the way they post online. And one time when I spoke with a rep at dispensary they told me they perform co2 for their terps but this was last year

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Bullshit marketing to gas up their $70+ trim run BHO grams

I think the carbonation is a result of the partial decarb their products seem to always have

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Please check out the link I posted. At the bottom of the page it shows a video of a jar being opened and Co2 being released from the jar. These levels of Co2 would not happen from decarbing the jar at room temp.

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Looks like the HTE was partially decarbed in a sealed jar then opened :man_shrugging:

All the labs I’ve seen from them are mostly decarbed on the htfse

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I’ve “carbonated” berries and grapes with dry ice. I doubt that carbonation would survive long through any more extraction than a dry sift, but I have no idea really.

Does it go pshhht like a soda when you open it?

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Yes it appears to have the pshhht sound when you open up a jar. Heres a video of it:

Are his nasty ass red extracts all fizzy when you buy them? I imagine that them being effervescent, would cause the terpenes to evaporate more easily. If you can smell it, it’s evaporating.

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Those look very meh

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We had him join us for a zoom call sesh a couple months ago and we spoke about it briefly. I think he said they add dry ice into the butane solution but wouldn’t go into much more detail. Can’t remember 100%… I think it’s in the first hour or so of this video - YouTube

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Right. Looks suspect to me. I don’t see a way thats not speeding terp loss.

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I understand that most people dont like extractioneering. If everyone doesnt like them why not just replicate the product and sell it for less? After all success is the best revenge.

Do you have any idea how one could could carbonate the cured trim they use to extract? Would dry ice and exposure over time create the effect like @breadwinner said with berries?

Their tests show 10-17% terpenes. I know the terpenes will decrease as they evaporate but maybe it makes the extracts more appealing. If it smells better to the consumer I would imagine the product would sell better or for more.

I agree the color is inconsistent and ive had tail fractions that look better than that jar lol. The question is if anything with the Co2 helps preserve terpenes better and how they add the Co2. One could just use CRC or better extraction techs to get a better color.

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Thats interesting! It would make sense if they were trying to cool a butane solution and just placed a couple of pellets right into the solution. They mention its a balance,

“It was a mistake, then it was a mystery. Then it was Tasty. Then it became elegant. Then it became too much. Then it was just right.”

The mystery could be why is the butane pressure high or why is the butane bubbling like that? The balance could be how much dry ice they add to the solution.

Could it also speed up butane loss? What if the terp loss is done purposely to make the extracts smell like terps more as a way to sell it. Easier and cheaper to get a customer to smell a product in the store and buy it vs believing the salesperson pitch and trying it.

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My pet theory is the do a cold run for the higher end htfse/hcfse, pour off the excess HTE and decarb. For the rind it looks like a warm run to get everything else from the biomass

Maybe they use co2 to push? The carbonation doesn’t add to the appeal as a consumer imo, idk why it’s central to their marketing

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During recovery, wouldn’t the co2 evaporate out of the extracts? Maybe I’m missing something?

I’m confused how of they’re doing a hydrocarbon extract and keeping co2 in it like they claim.

Edit: my bs meter is going off on their claims. I’m in agreement with @pdxcanna, this is marketing and they’re just selling partially decarbed extracts.

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I do think you could be right about the rind. Not sure about the Co2 push as it wouldn’t diffuse into the butane quickly but is possible.

I thought the same thing. Maybe the Co2 bubbling allows the butane to escape easier and preserve terpenes through less vac time.

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