List of controlled plants

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose and Morning Glory seeds both naturally produce LSA and LSH/LAH aswell as several other related analogs. HBWR seeds contain the most compared to morning glory. They naturally occur and don’t need a fungus or anything specific to happen to produce it. However there are different “strains” of HBWR with the “Hawaiian strain” (Argyreia nervosa var. nervosa) being the best one for LSA while an Indian strain (Argyreia nervosa var. speciosa) contains none. For Morning Glory you need 50-100+ seeds (depending which one) and for HBWR you only need 5 but would probably throw up if you took over 9. They don’t contain Cyanide related compounds despite misinformation on the internet and it us highly unlikely for any seeds to be “treated or sprayed” even when industrially sold by gardening companies.

Ergot fungus is the thing that grows on plants, specifically rye but it is is not enjoyable as HBWR or Morning Glory. Very intense vasoconstriction even more so than HBWR or MG does and that effect is already strong. The LSA found in the seeds are legally a Schedule 3 but would be considered an analog of LSD when intended for human consumption under the FAA making it a Sch 1. The seeds/plant are legal for ornamental use only,. A few of the minor structurally related compounds are sold as prescription medicines in the USA. It’s important to note a pregnant person cannot use HBWR/MG/Ergot and due to vasoconstriction nobody with heart issues or prone to panic should either. In my experience LSA has a tendency to be a little “darker” than LSD but can be just as enjoyable in the “goofy laughy way” but can be alot more mental with a very strong body load with an almost “intoxicating like effect” ontop of it. Plenty of good times and bad times but I have been to industry shows where people hear the word “LSA” and want nothing to do with it after their experience.

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I don’t see any of those plants being legalized in my lifetime except decriminalization for personal use or strict prescriptions (like Ketamine treatment being prescribed but only if you fail a medication so many times) If an organization would have the money to lobby for them to become legalized they would probably have more success investing in plant that is already legal (specifically legal/regulated for consumption not just legal in general) and protecting them from becoming illegal. There are a few different lobby groups already, one of them being MAPS which funded the FDA drug trials for MDMA for PTSD. Many others are more local-based, like Oakland decriminalized “all natural psychedelic substances” while Santa Cruz decriminalized mushrooms.

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Whether you are being pessimistic or realistic will be determined by how successful the efforts of the optimists are. I see products like coca tea being available at your corner store within the next five years. There are discussions to do so as we speak and if you want to be apart of them I suggest you change your outlook.

I think Salvia sales got banned here in Massachusetts.

If HBWR seeds didn’t make you feel like you were about to die they’d be a lot more enjoyable. I’ve had some success with using asthma inhalers during the trip to counter act the effects. It’s a beautiful plant as well.

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try doing an etoh extract on hbrw then filter and let evaporate then do a naptha extraction on what’s leftover and filter then evaporate. takes away that nausea

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don’t bother with naphtha, it’s not worth the toxic residues. and besides you can still get very sick regardless. they have almost no recreational value, if anything the deter naive experimentation. not unlike yopo…

i dabbed it and it felt like a psychedelic but with no visuals, was very interesting IMO

Check this paper out super incredible breakdown of the compounds in HBWR and their pharmacology https://psilosybiini.info/paperit/Argyreia%20nervosa%20(Burm.%20f.)%20receptor%20profiling%20of%20lysergic%20acid%20amide%20and%20other%20potential%20psychedelic%20LSD-like%20compounds%20by%20computational%20and%20binding%20assay%20approaches%20(Paulke%20et%20al.,%202013).pdf

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