Now that farm bill has passed


#1

I know we talk about crop insurance available now…but will it cover if crop goes “hot” will it cover the farm becoming “seeded”

I am sure it will cover hail and stuff like that…but what about stuff that makes our crops almost worthless.

Also, now that the farm bill has passed. Will this allow banks to loan money to farms…to buy seeds…land etc?

Just wondering


#2

Yes, banks can loan money now. Technically, they could before this, but the law was convoluted so they didn’t.

What they loan money for is a matter of bank policy, generally they like hard assets they can foreclose on if you don’t pay.


#3

Crop insurance is usually to cover something under an act of God. Not human negligence


#4

Sure, but who would buy crop insurance that didn’t cover what they thought were their major risks?

The insurance hemp farmers need may never have existed before, and now it can. When it does what are the features it needs to have?

Before underwriters are willing to look at this, we need to define wtf we need out of it. The object is not to buy what is available, but to drive availability of what is needed.

Edit: I suspect that Phylos has the Gigs Of Data that can tell hot shemales from true girl on girl.


#5

I think it’s so new and it’s a really big risk for the company insurance for seed stock would cost a lot. Insurance companies are the House they always need to win.


#6

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I thought the Farm bill was opening the door to federal crop insurance that wasn’t available before?

I would expect that insurers won’t want to cover crop seeding, without at least paying a much higher premium, due to how common crop seeding is.

Not sure how it is in your states, but in VT it’s not uncommon to have another hemp farmer within 10 miles of you, and if their crop pop males the wind can definitely bring pollen to your crop.


#7

There’s a great argument for GMO hemp right there.

Can you say seedless?

I bet I could use extant data to design an unseedible strain. An inducibly seedable solution wouldn’t be much more difficult from a design stand point.

Might take four or five years to get the thing working, but that’s assuming I start from scratch. In a lab already doing tissue culture successfully, I might be able to manage three years or even two.

Anyone with such a lab &/or $500k to throw at the problem should hit me up :wink:

Edit: yeah, not a farmer. Was using insurance in general as my model. Would certainly expect “seeding” insurance to carry a premium that reflected the risk.

And I agree that acts of god, and acts of Billy-Bob, should be kept in separate categories :wink:


#8

I have a spray to keep a plant from producing seeds. Came up with it while depping good ol jager which herms out like mf in dep. now if it will pass on a test that I do not know


#9

What is it about the spray that makes you feel it wouldn’t?


#10

Sounds like good ole florel

Https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/ethephon


#11

Yes exactly I’d have to check my Ol dope growin notes but I added something to it to make it more effective


#12

You need a surficant. Black market used dish soap. Idk the regulations on that though


#13

Baby shampoo ftw!


#14

Pretty much any degreaser is going to be a surfactant


#15

No like it was something w the ph and then certain application time


#16

Switch is another “spray” to turn hermies back to females.

Colloidal silver
Sts


#17

Switch is also etephon (sp?). Do not get it on the buds. It needs light to work


#18

Clean surfactant options - Aloe, Yucca, Ritha (soapnut)

I’d imagine it’s cheaper to roll with a generic AG surfactant tho.


#19

Colloidal silver based?


#20

This exact situation almost have happened to us last season these guys didn’t call any of their males and just let them go see did their entire crop and they are above where my property sits…luckly no issue