C1d1 in Maine


#1

Anyone in Maine have to deal with the fire marshall yet and are they requiring c1d1 rooms for licensing? I’m thinking on building one out… c1d1 shack/shed??.. low budget as possible.


#2

Yeah I’m interested in this as well.


#3

I hear they are inspecting and shutting down labs that have notified mmmp of processing/extracting if they are not up to code. Ethanol labs supposed to be c1d1 from what I’m hearing


#4

We have built several labs in Maine. We understand C1D1 and the regs.

Problem is, it is going to be expensive. You are easy over $250K-$1m once you do a buildout, buy certified equipment etc.


#5

How can that be, 250 to 1 mil? what are we talking ventillation, gas detection, electrical, one hotplate and fire protection? Engineer to sign off…


#6

Maine is the wild west of Cannabis. Lets kerp it that way! Lol! Shipping container in the woods. Done. Thats a No1C1!


#7

From what i heard , it may be incorrect but this : for hydrocarbon must be c1d1 and state engineer certified, for ethanol c1d2 . The cheapest route i have find so far is a prefab unit . They start around $40,000 i am currently in the process of finding a new location for myself.


#8

What are the differences between D1and D2? Im interested in moving myself. Article 38 in the fire and safety code is an interesting read.


#9

Here from one i was looking at

In a C1D1 location, ignitable concentrations of flammable gases or vapors may exist under normal operating conditions, or because of repair, maintenance, or a leak. They also may exist because of a breakdown, or faulty operation may release ignitable concentrations of flammable gases or vapors.

In a C1D2 location, volatile flammable liquids or gases are used but are normally confined in closed containers or closed systems. It also may be a place where ignitable concentrations of gases or vapors are prevented with positive mechanical ventilation. They only escape in the event of an accident or breakdown. Or a C1D2 location may be next to a C1D1 location, and the ignitable concentrations of gases or vapors might be occasionally present unless prevented with adequate positive-pressure ventilation with effective safeguards against ventilation failure.

Certified Safety

If your safety shower’s electrical equipment isn’t certified for your C1D1 or C1D2 location, it can contribute to an explosion. Safety showers used in these types of hazardous places need to have equipment that’s certified for use under those conditions.

In C1D1 and C1D2 locations, safety shower water heaters need to provide protection from sparks or flames, to prevent explosions. In addition, all other electrical equipment on the shower needs to be certified for use in those specific conditions. This list includes the lights, water chillers, gauges, temperature indicators, and alarm system. And it’s not enough for the parts individually to be certified—you should be looking for an Assembly-Certified product.

ShieldSafe offers some of the only Assembly-Certified safety showers on the market. This new, stricter regulation adopted by Washington State ensures our showers are the best-performing and safest on the market.

Our cubicle showers with gravity-fed tanks are not only Assembly-Certified, but they also meet all ANSI (2014) and OSHA regulations, and are safely at home in any explosive area.

To keep your workers protected in your C1D1 or C1D2 location, you need a safety shower that goes beyond the minimum requirements. With ShieldSafe, your employees will have peace of mind knowing their safety equipment will never be the cause of accident


#10

Thank you. Very informative! From my experience, I havnt seen any legit labs yet. Everyone feels theyve done enough. Many rude awakenings to come! Prices crashing with Lab costs rising is not a good combo.! Lol.


#11

There will most likely be pockets of c1d1 envelopes in your facility. Typically any exposed vapor of heated ethanol will definitely be division 1 in around any storage relief Vince will also be division 1 does your sop include reproofing ethanol? If so you will definitely have even more division 1 instances. Ethanol is a class 1 division d substance some of the facility will fall under division 2 and some will fall under division 1 of NFPA guidelines I would not count on a full c1d2 build-out of an ethanol extraction facility to be legal


#12

I believe kind guy extractions is the only approved lab as of right now. We have our c1d1 set up but have yet to be inspected. Only thing I’m worried we may need is an updated sprinkler system.


#13

Is you booth outside or inside…


#14

It’s a HAL pre fab c1d1 indoors


#15

Glad to read you got ur booth buddy! Hope all is well!


#16

Sorry if that came off a little shocking. Here would be a bare bones budget for what you are trying to do -

Pre-fab C1D1 booth with Maine engineer stamped EPR - 50k
Certified and ASME stamped closed loop extractor with EPR paperwork - 25-50k
Chillers, heaters, UL listed - 15-50k
Certified recovery pump - 15-25k
UL listed ovens - 10k
Architect fees - 5k
MEP engineering plans - 5k
Plan submittals, permits, etc - 5k
Commissioning and calibration of classified equipment (sensors, normally done by a licensed FPE) - 5k
MIS (material inventory and storage plan), trans fill storage - 5k
Cost of construction modifications (electrical drops, certified lighting, building modifications, firewalls, etc) - 10-25k
Dry Chem system (if needed) - 10k
Sprinkler mods (if needed) - 5k
Equipment engineering field verification - 10-15k
Final permits and certifications - 10k
Operator factory acceptance training (if required buy AHJ) - 5-10k

Basically that gets you a single booth, with a single extractor, and some small ovens. The hidden costs are all over. Once you start hiring professional contractors and engineers the fees go crazy because it is a highly hazardous environment. Every operates under the cover your ass principle do to the risk in stamping something like that. I think those numbers add up to about 250ish. I am sure there is some areas that you can cut back on, but it definitely isn’t for the faint of heart.


#17

So I suppose an etoh lab would share many of the same build out expenses? Maybe minus a few? Would the booth be replaced with a walkin hood for evap equipment? Looks like engineers are going to make out great!


#18

I got a small connex and 20 gs to make it happen. connex in the woods and a few cases of beer…


#19

Yeah, I think Canna-Shiners will be on the up & up. No more copper in the woods, stainless and glass only! Lol!


#20

Lol… its maine. The copper is still out there…